The Atlantic4 begin their 3,000 mile rowing challenge in aid of Spinal Research

PUBLISHED: 12:59 01 December 2011 | UPDATED: 20:23 20 February 2013

The Atlantic4 begin their 3,000 mile rowing challenge in aid of Spinal Research

The Atlantic4 begin their 3,000 mile rowing challenge in aid of Spinal Research

This Sunday, the 4th December, the Atlantic4 crew will finally start their 3,000 mile rowing challenge in aid of Spinal Research, departing the Spanish port of San Sebastian in the Canary Island of La Gomera, en route to Port Charles, Barbados.

This Sunday, the 4th December, the Atlantic4 crew will finally start their 3,000 mile rowing challenge in aid of Spinal Research, departing the Spanish port of San Sebastian in the Canary Island of La Gomera, en route to Port Charles, Barbados.



The team of four graduates, including Exeter twins Hugo and Ross Turner, is not only hoping to raise 150,000 for Spinal Research by taking part in the Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge, but also break the record for the youngest team to ever row the Atlantic.



Hugo Turner, crew member, said: For the last week we have been prepping all of our equipment and readying the boat for sea. Although our boat is brand new, there are lots of bits of kit that need attaching or setting up. Not to mention over 2000 packets of food to package up into 24hr packs!



We are trying to eat as much as we can at the moment. We will consume around 6500 calories per day on the boat, but will still probably loose between two and three stone during the crossing.



We are all so busy getting ready that we havent had much time for contemplation as we're normally either flat out or sleeping! We are sure it will all sink in as the race start draws nearer.



Totally unaided for the entire eight week journey, the team will row the famous Coloumbus route heading west bound, across the mid-Atlantic. Battling constant exposure to the Atlantic elements, 30ft waves and the threat of collision with vessels, the crew hopes to arrive at the Barbados finish line in early February.



Not only have the team had to prepare physically, the sea survival aspect to the challenge has meant the team has needed to pass complex first aid and navigational courses. Vital in ensuring all crew members can cope in the potential life-threatening situations the team are sure to come up against.



The inspiration to raise 150,000 for Spinal Research came from crew-member Hugo. At the age of 17, Hugos life changed forever as a freak accident at his local beach in Cornwall caused his C7 vertebrae to be crushed. The severe damage to his spinal cord meant Hugo needed to undergo surgery for neck reconstruction. After a long and painful recovery Hugo was finally able to walk again. Six years on, at the age of 23, Hugo is now putting his injury behind and taking part in this Atlantic row challenge.



For more information on the Atlantic4 and to keep up to date with their progress, please visit http://www.theatlantic4.com/. You can also sponsor the crew online at www.justgiving.com/theatlantic4.



You can learn more about Spinal Research, the UKs leading charity funding medical research around the world to develop reliable treatments for paralysis caused by a broken back or neck, by visiting www.spinal-research.org.

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